Posts Tagged ‘União Soviética’

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Chernobyl: 25 anos do maior desastre nuclear da história

26 de abril de 2011

RIA Novolsti
25/04/2011

Russia’s Medvedev to make anniversary trip to Chernobyl

Chernobyl: 25 years since the nuclear disaster

 

Russian President Dmitry Medvedev will visit Chernobyl on Tuesday to mark the 25th anniversary of the worst nuclear disaster in history.

“I will go to Chernobyl tomorrow,” the Russian president said on Monday during an award ceremony in the Kremlin for participants in the clean up operation of the 1986 disaster.

The area around the Chernobyl plant, about 150 kilometers (93 miles) from the Ukrainian capital of Kiev, remains highly contaminated from an explosion at the plant’s reactor number four a quarter of a century ago.

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Vídeo: “A Batalha de Chernobyl” no Discovery Channel

20 de abril de 2011

“A Batalha de Chernobyl” no Discovery Channel  ( 1 de 9 )

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“A Batalha de Chernobyl” no Discovery Channel  ( 2 de 9 )

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Vídeo documentário: “O Desastre de Chernobyl: Hora Zero” no Discovery Channel

20 de abril de 2011

No próximo dia 26 de abril de 2011 completam-se 25 anos do acidente na Usina de Chernobyl, ocorrido em 1986 na então União Soviética, na cidade de Pripyat (atual Ucrânia). O vídeo documentário a seguir, retrata os momentos finais que antecederam o acidente, que levou ao incêndio e derretimento parcial do reator 4, que lançou grande quantidade de material radioativo na atmosfera, no que ficou marcado como o maior acidente nuclear de toda a História.

Parte 1

Parte 2

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A gravidade do acidente nuclear em Fukushima comparada ao de Chernobyl

15 de abril de 2011

Scientific American
Apr 12, 2011

Is Fukushima really as bad as Chernobyl?

By David Biello 

satellite image of Fukushima Daiichi explosionOne month to the day after the devastating twin blows of a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and subsequent 15-meter tall tsunami, Japanese officials have reclassified the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant at the highest possible level. The partial meltdown of three reactors and at least two spent fuel pools, along with multiple hydrogen explosions at the site now rate a 7 on the International Nuclear Event Scale—a level previously affixed only to the meltdown and explosion at Chernobyl.

Fukushima is now officially a “major accident” per the scale—roughly 100 times worse than the worst civilian nuclear accident in the U.S.: the partial meltdown at Three Mile Island—constituting “a major release of radioactive material with widespread health and environmental effects.”
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